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Discussione Help manitoba flour

  1. #1
    • Data Registrazione: Sep 2008
    • Località: Emirati Arabi
    • Messaggi: 70
    • Inserzioni nell'Archivio
      1

    Help manitoba flour

    Hi guys,
    please, help me how to get the "manitoba" flour in USA. We have "special flour for bread", "all poupose flour" and " pastry flour".
    They come organic, or unbleached or bleached.
    I made Amateur "cornetti perfetti" with great result, using the flour "special for bread".
    But my pizza is just too gummy and I think I need a stronger flour to get a crusty one.
    If somebody can give a hint what to use instead of "manitoba" flour, i will be glad.
    Thanks,
    ...xoxo Frida

  2. #2
    • Data Registrazione: Nov 2005
    • Località: Prov.Napoli
    • Messaggi: 154
    Hello,

    In Malta we have either Plain Flour (used for pastry, pizza, etc) or Self Raising Flour (used for cakes, sponges etc) ; Don't know what to suggest Here in Italy I don't even use either the 00 or 0, depends which one comes out first My husband never argues : its either that or else the pizzeria one

    Sorry but I don't think I was of much help, did I !!!

    Hugs and regards

  3. #3
    Hi,in the U.K. i've always used "Extra strong bread flour",but i don't know whether such flour is easily available elsewhere.
    Regards,Viva

  4. #4
    • Data Registrazione: Sep 2008
    • Località: Emirati Arabi
    • Messaggi: 70
    • Inserzioni nell'Archivio
      1
    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da Puntina Visualizza Messaggio
    Hello,

    In Malta we have either Plain Flour (used for pastry, pizza, etc) or Self Raising Flour (used for cakes, sponges etc) ; Don't know what to suggest Here in Italy I don't even use either the 00 or 0, depends which one comes out first My husband never argues : its either that or else the pizzeria one

    Sorry but I don't think I was of much help, did I !!!

    Hugs and regards


    Thank you, Puntina.
    I learnt how to use different kind of flours in USA, as I made many mistakes (believe me, some stuff came out very disgusting!).
    My main concern is when I read on the italian recepies "farina manitoba" and I substitude it with another one. The final product doesn't come as I want.
    Anyway, thank you and enjoy my beautiful country!
    talk you soon
    Frida

  5. #5
    • Data Registrazione: Sep 2008
    • Località: Emirati Arabi
    • Messaggi: 70
    • Inserzioni nell'Archivio
      1
    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da vivalapappa Visualizza Messaggio
    Hi,in the U.K. i've always used "Extra strong bread flour",but i don't know whether such flour is easily available elsewhere.
    Regards,Viva

    Thank you, viva
    I never saw in USA the extra strong bread flour, and it seems to me the equivalent to Manitoba flour. I read about the story of manitoba flour and it drives me crazy as I live very close to that canadian region; the flour was done for the export to the european market after the II world war, to cover the need of the hungry and deprivated people. Then the Italians begun to use it for their pizza dough, with excellent results.
    I am losing my hope to find it here, but thank you anyway.
    best wishes
    Frida

  6. #6
    • Data Registrazione: Jan 2008
    • Località: Finger Lakes Region, New York
    • Messaggi: 685
    • Inserzioni nell'Archivio
      47
    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da roman cafe' Visualizza Messaggio
    Thank you, viva
    I never saw in USA the extra strong bread flour, and it seems to me the equivalent to Manitoba flour. I read about the story of manitoba flour and it drives me crazy as I live very close to that canadian region; the flour was done for the export to the european market after the II world war, to cover the need of the hungry and deprivated people. Then the Italians begun to use it for their pizza dough, with excellent results.
    I am losing my hope to find it here, but thank you anyway.
    best wishes
    Frida
    Frida, any flour that you buy in Canada is a bit stronger than the flour in the USA. I usually go to Canada and every time I get a couple of bags of canadian flour. If it is difficult for you to go to canada my suggestion will be to add a little durum semolina to your all purpose flour.
    Manitoba has a higher percentage of protein than all purpose flour.
    Francesco

  7. #7
    • Data Registrazione: Sep 2008
    • Località: Emirati Arabi
    • Messaggi: 70
    • Inserzioni nell'Archivio
      1
    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da rossello44 Visualizza Messaggio
    Frida, any flour that you buy in Canada is a bit stronger than the flour in the USA. I usually go to Canada and every time I get a couple of bags of canadian flour. If it is difficult for you to go to canada my suggestion will be to add a little durum semolina to your all purpose flour.
    Manitoba has a higher percentage of protein than all purpose flour.
    Francesco
    Hi Francesco, thank you for your iinformation!!!!
    I have Bob's red hill durum semolina for making pasta, but could you tell me how is the proportion to have a fine pizza flour that works?
    I have found the flour " better for bread" and sometime I mix it with unbleached all porpose flour or I use as it is. Anyway, my pizza has always a gummy backtaste!
    p.s. Canada is not that close to me, we are in front of NYC, and even there I cannot find the Manitoba flour. Simply it doesn't exist.

    Hope to hear back from you,

    Frida

  8. #8
    • Data Registrazione: Apr 2007
    • Località: Köln (Germania)
    • Messaggi: 1,178
    When I was living in Canada I used to use the "all pourpouse flour" for cake, pastry, and pizza and the "bread flour" for bread, "danubio" (sorry, I don't know how to translate..) and any other things that need a strong flour. There was also the "self-raising" with baking powder added (and maybe starch), but I never used that.
    Believe me..never saw "Manitoba" flour in Canada...and I was living in Saskatchewan, so quite close...... I think that simply it's not known with that name, because "Manitoba" is just the name of one of the wheat varieties producing a high protein content flour. So the "bread flour", over there, was a mixture of "strong" wheat flour and was perfect for that pourpouse. I'm sure in US is the same. If the cornetti were perfect, means that the flour was strong enough: you need this very strong flour for dough very "heavy" so when there are eggs, butter and so on.. pizza is just flour, water a bit of salt and a bit of yeast.
    For pizza there are as many recipies as italians... I don't use Manitoba or strong flour for pizza, but common 00 or 0 (in Italy). So I would use the "all porpouse". But then, as I said, everybody as his own... with semolina (more crusty, so maybe that's what you want), with Manitoba, with 0...

  9. #9
    • Data Registrazione: Sep 2008
    • Località: Emirati Arabi
    • Messaggi: 70
    • Inserzioni nell'Archivio
      1
    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da ChiaraC Visualizza Messaggio
    When I was living in Canada I used to use the "all pourpouse flour" for cake, pastry, and pizza and the "bread flour" for bread, "danubio" (sorry, I don't know how to translate..) and any other things that need a strong flour. There was also the "self-raising" with baking powder added (and maybe starch), but I never used that.
    Believe me..never saw "Manitoba" flour in Canada...and I was living in Saskatchewan, so quite close...... I think that simply it's not known with that name, because "Manitoba" is just the name of one of the wheat varieties producing a high protein content flour. So the "bread flour", over there, was a mixture of "strong" wheat flour and was perfect for that pourpouse. I'm sure in US is the same. If the cornetti were perfect, means that the flour was strong enough: you need this very strong flour for dough very "heavy" so when there are eggs, butter and so on.. pizza is just flour, water a bit of salt and a bit of yeast.
    For pizza there are as many recipies as italians... I don't use Manitoba or strong flour for pizza, but common 00 or 0 (in Italy). So I would use the "all porpouse". But then, as I said, everybody as his own... with semolina (more crusty, so maybe that's what you want), with Manitoba, with 0...

    Thank you thank you thank you!!!!You were very helpful!!!
    I will make my pizza dough with the all porpose flour and the addition of durum semolina. I hope I am getting the "perfect" pizza, I really miss a good bite!

  10. #10
    • Data Registrazione: Jan 2008
    • Località: Finger Lakes Region, New York
    • Messaggi: 685
    • Inserzioni nell'Archivio
      47
    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da roman cafe' Visualizza Messaggio
    Hi Francesco, thank you for your iinformation!!!!
    I have Bob's red hill durum semolina for making pasta, but could you tell me how is the proportion to have a fine pizza flour that works?
    I have found the flour " better for bread" and sometime I mix it with unbleached all porpose flour or I use as it is. Anyway, my pizza has always a gummy backtaste!
    p.s. Canada is not that close to me, we are in front of NYC, and even there I cannot find the Manitoba flour. Simply it doesn't exist.

    Hope to hear back from you,

    Frida
    Hi Frida
    as far as proportions I don't know. I would start with 10 % and take from there, however I use all pourpose flour and i am very happy. I always get some flour when I go to Canada because I like their flour better than the one I get in the states (I use it when I need a stronger four). I am very close to the border line (one hour from Niagara Falls. Just out of curiosity are there any Wegmans super markets in your area? if so get the all pourpose flour with Wegmans name on the bag and get the one that says: Unbleached and Unbrominated, it is a super product by far. Wegmans is a local supermarket in my area, but in the last few years they've expanded to New Jersey, Pennsilvania and Virginia, so I would not be surprised if there is a wegmans near by you. Let me know.
    Ciao ciao
    Francesco

12 »

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